2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/293943
Title:
Environmental effects on coral growth and recruitment in the Caribbean
Authors:
Crabbe, M. James C.
Abstract:
Knowledge about factors that are important in coral reef growth help us to understand how reef ecosystems react following major anthropogenic and environmental disturbances. In addition, they may help the industry understand how aquarists can improve the health of their corals. The author have studied environmental and climate effects on corals on fringing reefs in Jamaica. Radial growth rates (mm/yr) of non-branching corals calculated on an annual basis from 2000–2008 showed few significant differences either spatially or temporally along the north coast, although growth rates tended to be higher on reefs of higher rugosity and lower macroalgal cover. He has also reconstructed recruitment patterns, using growth modelling, for nonbranching corals at sites on the north coast of Jamaica near Discovery Bay, and near Kingston Harbour, on the south coast. The aim was to better understand the impacts of tropical storms on coral reefs and for aquarists to better maintain coral reef species in artificial environments.
Citation:
Crabbe, M.J.C. (2011) 'Environmental effects on coral growth and recruitment in the Caribbean', Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 92(04), pp.747-752
Publisher:
Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
Journal:
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/293943
DOI:
10.1017/S0025315411001913
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0025315411001913
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0025-3154; 1469-7769
Appears in Collections:
Environmental Monitoring Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrabbe, M. James C.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-06-13T14:22:08Z-
dc.date.available2013-06-13T14:22:08Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationCrabbe, M.J.C. (2011) 'Environmental effects on coral growth and recruitment in the Caribbean', Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, 92(04), pp.747-752en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0025-3154-
dc.identifier.issn1469-7769-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0025315411001913-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/293943-
dc.description.abstractKnowledge about factors that are important in coral reef growth help us to understand how reef ecosystems react following major anthropogenic and environmental disturbances. In addition, they may help the industry understand how aquarists can improve the health of their corals. The author have studied environmental and climate effects on corals on fringing reefs in Jamaica. Radial growth rates (mm/yr) of non-branching corals calculated on an annual basis from 2000–2008 showed few significant differences either spatially or temporally along the north coast, although growth rates tended to be higher on reefs of higher rugosity and lower macroalgal cover. He has also reconstructed recruitment patterns, using growth modelling, for nonbranching corals at sites on the north coast of Jamaica near Discovery Bay, and near Kingston Harbour, on the south coast. The aim was to better understand the impacts of tropical storms on coral reefs and for aquarists to better maintain coral reef species in artificial environments.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMarine Biological Association of the United Kingdomen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0025315411001913en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdomen_GB
dc.subjecttropical stormsen_GB
dc.subjectbleachingen_GB
dc.subjectclimate changeen_GB
dc.subjectglobal warmingen_GB
dc.subjectJamaicaen_GB
dc.titleEnvironmental effects on coral growth and recruitment in the Caribbeanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdomen_GB
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