2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/279565
Title:
Self-supervision, surveillance and transgression
Authors:
Simon, Gail
Abstract:
Transgression is not only an inevitable part of systemic supervision but is also necessary if we are to work towards innovative and inclusive supervisory and therapeutic practice. Defying culturally generated ‘rules’ of systemic practice can allow for more relevant and productive ways of talking. Systemic practitioners are increasingly finding themselves trying to practice systemic therapy in employing authorities and training courses which are dominated by inflexible professional narratives and manualised procedures. Our profession is committed to ethical inner and outer dialogue, to self- and relational reflexivity as distinct from the rule-bound surveillance culture in which we live and work. Systemic supervisors and therapists may find themselves at odds with monological institutional discourse and attempts from within our own profession to manualise practice. I introduce examples from supervisory conversations to illustrate how supervisors can develop more culturally sensitive practices through supporting practitioners to hear and have heard their own marginalised and oppressed voices and those of their clients.
Citation:
Simon, G. (2010). 'Self-supervision, surveillance and transgression', 32 (3):308-325 Journal of Family Therapy
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of Family Therapy
Issue Date:
2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/279565
DOI:
10.1111/j.1467-6427.2010.00505.x
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1467-6427.2010.00505.x
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
01634445; 14676427
Appears in Collections:
Social Work, Professional Practice and the Law

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Gailen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-10T14:39:33Z-
dc.date.available2013-04-10T14:39:33Z-
dc.date.issued2010-
dc.identifier.citationSimon, G. (2010). 'Self-supervision, surveillance and transgression', 32 (3):308-325 Journal of Family Therapyen_GB
dc.identifier.issn01634445-
dc.identifier.issn14676427-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-6427.2010.00505.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/279565-
dc.description.abstractTransgression is not only an inevitable part of systemic supervision but is also necessary if we are to work towards innovative and inclusive supervisory and therapeutic practice. Defying culturally generated ‘rules’ of systemic practice can allow for more relevant and productive ways of talking. Systemic practitioners are increasingly finding themselves trying to practice systemic therapy in employing authorities and training courses which are dominated by inflexible professional narratives and manualised procedures. Our profession is committed to ethical inner and outer dialogue, to self- and relational reflexivity as distinct from the rule-bound surveillance culture in which we live and work. Systemic supervisors and therapists may find themselves at odds with monological institutional discourse and attempts from within our own profession to manualise practice. I introduce examples from supervisory conversations to illustrate how supervisors can develop more culturally sensitive practices through supporting practitioners to hear and have heard their own marginalised and oppressed voices and those of their clients.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1467-6427.2010.00505.xen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Family Therapyen_GB
dc.subjectsupervisionen_GB
dc.subjectsystemic therapyen_GB
dc.subjecttransgressionen_GB
dc.titleSelf-supervision, surveillance and transgressionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Family Therapyen_GB
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