Towards rapid 3D reconstruction using conventional X-ray for intraoperative orthopaedic applications

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/271698
Title:
Towards rapid 3D reconstruction using conventional X-ray for intraoperative orthopaedic applications
Authors:
Prakoonwit, Simant
Other Titles:
Applied signal and image processing: multidisciplinary advancements
Abstract:
A rapid 3D reconstruction of bones and other structures during an operation is an important issue. However, most of existing technologies are not feasible to be implemented in an intraoperative environment. Normally, a 3D reconstruction has to be done by a CT or an MRI pre operation or post operation. Due to some physical constraints, it is not feasible to utilise such machine intraoperatively. A special type of MRI has been developed to overcome the problem. However, all normal surgical tools and instruments cannot be employed. This chapter discusses a possible method to use a small number, e.g. 5, of conventional 2D X-ray images to reconstruct 3D bone and other structures intraoperatively. A statistical shape model is used to fit a set of optimal landmarks vertices, which are automatically created from the 2D images, to reconstruct a full surface. The reconstructed surfaces can then be visualised and manipulated by surgeons or used by surgical robotic systems.
Affiliation:
University of Reading
Citation:
Prakoonwit, S. (2011) 'Towards Rapid 3D Reconstruction using Conventional X-Ray for Intraoperative Orthopaedic Applications' in 'Applied Signal and Image Processing: Multidisciplinary Advancements' (eds. Rami Qahwaji , Roger Green and Evor L. Hines) IGI Global pp309-323
Publisher:
IGI Global
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/271698
DOI:
10.4018/978-1-60960-477-6.ch018
Additional Links:
http://www.igi-global.com/chapter/towards-rapid-reconstruction-using-conventional/52126
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781609604776
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Computer Graphics and Visualisation (CCGV)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPrakoonwit, Simanten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-11T12:03:27Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-11T12:03:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationPrakoonwit, S. (2011) 'Towards Rapid 3D Reconstruction using Conventional X-Ray for Intraoperative Orthopaedic Applications' in 'Applied Signal and Image Processing: Multidisciplinary Advancements' (eds. Rami Qahwaji , Roger Green and Evor L. Hines) IGI Global pp309-323en_GB
dc.identifier.isbn9781609604776-
dc.identifier.doi10.4018/978-1-60960-477-6.ch018-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/271698-
dc.description.abstractA rapid 3D reconstruction of bones and other structures during an operation is an important issue. However, most of existing technologies are not feasible to be implemented in an intraoperative environment. Normally, a 3D reconstruction has to be done by a CT or an MRI pre operation or post operation. Due to some physical constraints, it is not feasible to utilise such machine intraoperatively. A special type of MRI has been developed to overcome the problem. However, all normal surgical tools and instruments cannot be employed. This chapter discusses a possible method to use a small number, e.g. 5, of conventional 2D X-ray images to reconstruct 3D bone and other structures intraoperatively. A statistical shape model is used to fit a set of optimal landmarks vertices, which are automatically created from the 2D images, to reconstruct a full surface. The reconstructed surfaces can then be visualised and manipulated by surgeons or used by surgical robotic systems.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIGI Globalen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.igi-global.com/chapter/towards-rapid-reconstruction-using-conventional/52126en_GB
dc.titleTowards rapid 3D reconstruction using conventional X-ray for intraoperative orthopaedic applicationsen
dc.title.alternativeApplied signal and image processing: multidisciplinary advancementsen_GB
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Readingen_GB
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