2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/270784
Title:
Vulnerability, victims and free movement: the case of cyberstalking
Authors:
Maple, Carsten; Lang, Richard
Abstract:
Any crime can have enormous emotional and physical consequences for the victim. However, two potential attributes of a crime which can signifi cantly worsen the ordeal suff ered by the victim are, fi rstly, that it is committed behind closed doors, especially the doors of one’s home, and secondly, that it is committed anonymously.1 Cyberstalking, by which high-tech methods are used to distress, frighten and intimidate the victim, is almost unique in that it can possess both of these attributes, sometimes even both at once. Despite this, the European Commission, in a recent proposal for a directive, has not seen fi t to include it on a list of crimes the victims of which are “particularly vulnerable”. In this article, the authors consider the proposal in detail, before looking at cyberstalking itself, and demonstrating why, in their opinion, the new directive should be amended to contain a specific reference to this crime. Going forward, they call for bespoke EU legislation to protect victims of cyberstalking throughout Europe.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire, UK
Citation:
Maple, C. and Lang, R. (2012) “Vulnerability, Victims and Free Movement: the Case of Cyberstalking”, New Journal of European Criminal Law, 3 (2): 208-221
Publisher:
Intersentia
Journal:
New Journal of European Criminal Law
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/270784
Additional Links:
http://www.njecl.eu/table_of_content.aspx?sy=2012&pn=2
Type:
Article
Language:
en
EISSN:
2032-2844
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Research in Distributed Technologies (CREDIT)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMaple, Carstenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLang, Richarden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-01T11:56:16Z-
dc.date.available2013-03-01T11:56:16Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.citationMaple, C. and Lang, R. (2012) “Vulnerability, Victims and Free Movement: the Case of Cyberstalking”, New Journal of European Criminal Law, 3 (2): 208-221en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/270784-
dc.description.abstractAny crime can have enormous emotional and physical consequences for the victim. However, two potential attributes of a crime which can signifi cantly worsen the ordeal suff ered by the victim are, fi rstly, that it is committed behind closed doors, especially the doors of one’s home, and secondly, that it is committed anonymously.1 Cyberstalking, by which high-tech methods are used to distress, frighten and intimidate the victim, is almost unique in that it can possess both of these attributes, sometimes even both at once. Despite this, the European Commission, in a recent proposal for a directive, has not seen fi t to include it on a list of crimes the victims of which are “particularly vulnerable”. In this article, the authors consider the proposal in detail, before looking at cyberstalking itself, and demonstrating why, in their opinion, the new directive should be amended to contain a specific reference to this crime. Going forward, they call for bespoke EU legislation to protect victims of cyberstalking throughout Europe.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIntersentiaen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.njecl.eu/table_of_content.aspx?sy=2012&pn=2en_GB
dc.subjectcyberstalkingen_GB
dc.titleVulnerability, victims and free movement: the case of cyberstalkingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2032-2844-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshire, UKen_GB
dc.identifier.journalNew Journal of European Criminal Lawen_GB
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