Effort-reward imbalance and overcommitment: predicting strain in academic employees in the United Kingdom.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/251914
Title:
Effort-reward imbalance and overcommitment: predicting strain in academic employees in the United Kingdom.
Authors:
Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 ) ; Jones, Fiona
Abstract:
The Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model of job stress has gained support in predicting strain, mainly in heterogeneous groups of employees. This study tests several hypotheses relating to the ERI model in a homogenous occupational group: academic employees working in universities in the United Kingdom. Based on previous research findings, it is argued that this model is likely to reflect current working conditions and concerns in this sector. Eight hundred forty-four academic employees (59% male) completed questionnaires assessing the ERI components (i.e., efforts, rewards, and overcommitment), psychological and physical symptoms, job satisfaction and leaving intentions. Significant main effects of high efforts, low rewards, and high overcommitment were found for all strain outcomes. Some evidence was found for the hypothesized two-way and three-way interactions. The pattern and strength of the predictors of strain varied considerably, with the models accounting for between 14% and 43% variance in strain outcomes. The validity of the ERI model as a predictor of a broad range of strain outcomes in academic employees in the United Kingdom has been confirmed. How the findings might be used to inform interventions to increase well-being in academic employees is discussed
Citation:
Effort-reward imbalance and overcommitment: Predicting strain in academic employees in the United Kingdom. 2008, 15 (4):pp 381- 395 International Journal of Stress Management
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Journal:
International Journal of Stress Management
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/251914
DOI:
10.1037/a0013213
Additional Links:
http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0013213
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1573-3424; 1072-5245
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, Fionaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-13T08:21:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-13T08:21:00Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationEffort-reward imbalance and overcommitment: Predicting strain in academic employees in the United Kingdom. 2008, 15 (4):pp 381- 395 International Journal of Stress Managementen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1573-3424-
dc.identifier.issn1072-5245-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0013213-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/251914-
dc.description.abstractThe Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) model of job stress has gained support in predicting strain, mainly in heterogeneous groups of employees. This study tests several hypotheses relating to the ERI model in a homogenous occupational group: academic employees working in universities in the United Kingdom. Based on previous research findings, it is argued that this model is likely to reflect current working conditions and concerns in this sector. Eight hundred forty-four academic employees (59% male) completed questionnaires assessing the ERI components (i.e., efforts, rewards, and overcommitment), psychological and physical symptoms, job satisfaction and leaving intentions. Significant main effects of high efforts, low rewards, and high overcommitment were found for all strain outcomes. Some evidence was found for the hypothesized two-way and three-way interactions. The pattern and strength of the predictors of strain varied considerably, with the models accounting for between 14% and 43% variance in strain outcomes. The validity of the ERI model as a predictor of a broad range of strain outcomes in academic employees in the United Kingdom has been confirmed. How the findings might be used to inform interventions to increase well-being in academic employees is discusseden_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0013213en_GB
dc.titleEffort-reward imbalance and overcommitment: predicting strain in academic employees in the United Kingdom.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Stress Managementen_GB
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