Recruiting UK-born ethnic minority women for health research – Lessons learned.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/250596
Title:
Recruiting UK-born ethnic minority women for health research – Lessons learned.
Authors:
Twamley, Katherine; Puthussery, Shuby ( 0000-0002-1865-9546 ) ; Macfarlane, Alison; Harding, Seeromanie; Ahmed, Shamoly; Mirsky, Judith
Abstract:
Recruitment of participants for health research is a vital part of the research process. If not done well it can lead to research bias and/or limit the generalisability of the findings of a study. Many investigators report difficulties in recruiting ethnic minority participants, in particular women. Previous articles have tended to explore strategies used to recruit people from migrant populations to quantitative studies, especially clinical trials. Drawing on a qualitative study about maternity care experiences of UK-born ethnic minority women in England, this paper describes and compares the efficacy of six recruitment strategies used for women from Black African, Black Caribbean, Irish, Pakistani, and Indian backgrounds. We explore women’s motivations and experiences in taking part in the study through retrospective interviews with participants and with health professionals who recruited participants through maternity clinics. The findings indicate that women’s motivations to participate in research are similar to those found in previous studies with minority and non-minority groups. Traditional routes of recruitment for ethnic minorities, such as through community groups, were less effective indicating that UK-born migrants require more diverse methods. Recruitment through health professionals requires an effort to ‘recruit the recruiter’ and a more collaborative relationship is recommended.
Citation:
Twamley, K., Puthussery, S., Macfarlane, A., Harding, S., Ahmed, S. and Mirsky, J. (2009) 'Recruiting UK-born ethnic minority women for health research – Lessons learned', Research Policy and Planning, 27(1), pp.25–38.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group
Journal:
Research Policy and Planning
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/250596
Additional Links:
http://ssrg.org.uk/research-policy-and-planning-volume-27/; http://www.scie-socialcareonline.org.uk/profile.asp?guid=870dbe6c-99f0-4d35-8ce2-acb877beb8e5
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0264-519X
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTwamley, Katherineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPuthussery, Shubyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMacfarlane, Alisonen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarding, Seeromanieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Shamolyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMirsky, Judithen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T15:11:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T15:11:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationTwamley, K., Puthussery, S., Macfarlane, A., Harding, S., Ahmed, S. and Mirsky, J. (2009) 'Recruiting UK-born ethnic minority women for health research – Lessons learned', Research Policy and Planning, 27(1), pp.25–38.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0264-519X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/250596-
dc.description.abstractRecruitment of participants for health research is a vital part of the research process. If not done well it can lead to research bias and/or limit the generalisability of the findings of a study. Many investigators report difficulties in recruiting ethnic minority participants, in particular women. Previous articles have tended to explore strategies used to recruit people from migrant populations to quantitative studies, especially clinical trials. Drawing on a qualitative study about maternity care experiences of UK-born ethnic minority women in England, this paper describes and compares the efficacy of six recruitment strategies used for women from Black African, Black Caribbean, Irish, Pakistani, and Indian backgrounds. We explore women’s motivations and experiences in taking part in the study through retrospective interviews with participants and with health professionals who recruited participants through maternity clinics. The findings indicate that women’s motivations to participate in research are similar to those found in previous studies with minority and non-minority groups. Traditional routes of recruitment for ethnic minorities, such as through community groups, were less effective indicating that UK-born migrants require more diverse methods. Recruitment through health professionals requires an effort to ‘recruit the recruiter’ and a more collaborative relationship is recommended.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSocial Services Research Groupen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://ssrg.org.uk/research-policy-and-planning-volume-27/en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.scie-socialcareonline.org.uk/profile.asp?guid=870dbe6c-99f0-4d35-8ce2-acb877beb8e5en_GB
dc.titleRecruiting UK-born ethnic minority women for health research – Lessons learned.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalResearch Policy and Planningen_GB
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