Reported school experiences of young people living with sickle cell disorder in England

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/250582
Title:
Reported school experiences of young people living with sickle cell disorder in England
Authors:
Dyson, Simon Martin; Abuateya, Hala; Atkin, Karl; Culley, Lorraine; Dyson, Sue Elizabeth; Rowley, Dave
Abstract:
A survey of 569 young people with sickle cell disorder (SCD) in England has found such pupils miss considerable periods of time from school, typically in short periods of two or three days. One in eight has school absences equating to government‐defined ‘persistent absence’. Students with SCD report that they are not helped to catch up after these school absences. Half the children reported not being allowed to use the toilet when needed and not being allowed water in class; a third reported being made to take unsuitable exercise and being called lazy when tired. Children perceived both physical environment (temperature, school furniture) and social environment (being upset by teachers or other pupils) as triggers to episodes of their illness. Policy initiatives on school absences; preventive measures to ensure maintenance of good health; and measures to prevent perceived social attitudes precipitating ill health would also support children with other chronic illnesses at school.
Citation:
Dyson, S., Abuateya, H., Atkin, K., Culley, L., Dyson. S. and Rowley, D. (2010) 'Reported school experiences of young people living with sickle cell disorder in England', British Educational Research Journal,36 (1), pp.125-142.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
British Educational Research Journal
Issue Date:
10-Jul-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/250582
DOI:
10.1080/01411920902878941
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01411920902878941
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0141-1926; 1469-3518
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Simon Martinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAbuateya, Halaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAtkin, Karlen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCulley, Lorraineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDyson, Sue Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRowley, Daveen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-30T15:28:47Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-30T15:28:47Z-
dc.date.issued2009-07-10-
dc.identifier.citationDyson, S., Abuateya, H., Atkin, K., Culley, L., Dyson. S. and Rowley, D. (2010) 'Reported school experiences of young people living with sickle cell disorder in England', British Educational Research Journal,36 (1), pp.125-142.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0141-1926-
dc.identifier.issn1469-3518-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01411920902878941-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/250582-
dc.description.abstractA survey of 569 young people with sickle cell disorder (SCD) in England has found such pupils miss considerable periods of time from school, typically in short periods of two or three days. One in eight has school absences equating to government‐defined ‘persistent absence’. Students with SCD report that they are not helped to catch up after these school absences. Half the children reported not being allowed to use the toilet when needed and not being allowed water in class; a third reported being made to take unsuitable exercise and being called lazy when tired. Children perceived both physical environment (temperature, school furniture) and social environment (being upset by teachers or other pupils) as triggers to episodes of their illness. Policy initiatives on school absences; preventive measures to ensure maintenance of good health; and measures to prevent perceived social attitudes precipitating ill health would also support children with other chronic illnesses at school.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01411920902878941en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Educational Research Journalen_GB
dc.subjectsickle cell disorderen
dc.subjectsickle cellen
dc.subjectchronic illnessen
dc.titleReported school experiences of young people living with sickle cell disorder in Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Educational Research Journalen_GB
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