What is in it for me? an exploratory study of the impact of involvement and attitude on clinical trial behaviour

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/244258
Title:
What is in it for me? an exploratory study of the impact of involvement and attitude on clinical trial behaviour
Authors:
Danbury, Annie Hagen; dos Santos, Jessica
Abstract:
Consumers in the “information society” are overloaded with marketing communication and have become efficient at screening such messages by asking a simple question: “what is in it for me?” Relevance and involvement are important factors determining attention to communications messages. The study investigates the relationship between attitudes to the advertisement (and message) and potential behaviour consequences in a clinical trial context by conducting a survey of 300 people. The results indicate that the relationship between involvement, attitude and potential behaviour differs greatly among different age groups. Findings suggest two levels of involvement, attitudinal and behavioural, as having a different impact on potential behaviour. The study aims to identify online behaviours of luxury brand advocates referring to differentiation between active and passive loyalists. A netnographic approach was used to observe groups of luxury handbag advocates. Key findings include an identification of engagement manifested in positive word of mouth and enthusiastic brand recommendation. Advocates routinely share their love of particular brands, openly expressing joy and sharing heightened levels of self-esteem. Engaged passive loyalists tend to share less with peers, but instead celebrate their purchases more personally.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Publisher:
European Advertising Academy
Journal:
ICORIA Conference Proceedings
Issue Date:
28-Jun-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/244258
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Advances in Marketing (CAM)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDanbury, Annie Hagenen_GB
dc.contributor.authordos Santos, Jessicaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T09:56:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T09:56:09Z-
dc.date.issued2009-06-28-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/244258-
dc.description.abstractConsumers in the “information society” are overloaded with marketing communication and have become efficient at screening such messages by asking a simple question: “what is in it for me?” Relevance and involvement are important factors determining attention to communications messages. The study investigates the relationship between attitudes to the advertisement (and message) and potential behaviour consequences in a clinical trial context by conducting a survey of 300 people. The results indicate that the relationship between involvement, attitude and potential behaviour differs greatly among different age groups. Findings suggest two levels of involvement, attitudinal and behavioural, as having a different impact on potential behaviour. The study aims to identify online behaviours of luxury brand advocates referring to differentiation between active and passive loyalists. A netnographic approach was used to observe groups of luxury handbag advocates. Key findings include an identification of engagement manifested in positive word of mouth and enthusiastic brand recommendation. Advocates routinely share their love of particular brands, openly expressing joy and sharing heightened levels of self-esteem. Engaged passive loyalists tend to share less with peers, but instead celebrate their purchases more personally.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Advertising Academyen_GB
dc.subjectclinical trialsen_GB
dc.subjectinvolvementen_GB
dc.subjectattitude to the advertisementsen_GB
dc.subjectadvertisingen_GB
dc.titleWhat is in it for me? an exploratory study of the impact of involvement and attitude on clinical trial behaviouren
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalICORIA Conference Proceedingsen_GB
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