Informing the UK's South Asian communities on organ donation and transplantation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/237712
Title:
Informing the UK's South Asian communities on organ donation and transplantation
Authors:
Khan, Zafar; Randhawa, Gurch ( 0000-0002-2289-5859 )
Abstract:
There is a growing demand for human organs for transplantation, particularly of the kidney among the UK's South Asian population which, due to problems with histocompatibility can only be met with a significant increase in the number of Asian donors. Specific attempts have only recently been made to attract donors from South Asian communities using 'ethnically-targeted mass media'. A recent pilot study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of these initiatives in providing information with regards to organ donation for the South Asian population. The findings show that detailed information related to transplantation activity had been learned only through the experience of people undergoing transplants within the community and has been transmitted through various informal networks rather than through the resources provided by the Department of Health. This paper provides an overview of who the South Asians are and how these community networks were established.
Affiliation:
University of Luton
Citation:
Khan, Z. and Randhawa, G. (1999) 'Informing the UK's South Asian communities on organ donation and transplantation', EDTNA/ERCA Journal, 25 (1), pp.12-4.
Publisher:
European Renal Care Association
Journal:
EDTNA/ERCA journal (English ed.)
Issue Date:
1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/237712
PubMed ID:
10418370
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10418370
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1019-083X
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKhan, Zafaren_GB
dc.contributor.authorRandhawa, Gurchen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-08T11:06:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-08T11:06:25Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.citationKhan, Z. and Randhawa, G. (1999) 'Informing the UK's South Asian communities on organ donation and transplantation', EDTNA/ERCA Journal, 25 (1), pp.12-4.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1019-083X-
dc.identifier.pmid10418370-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/237712-
dc.description.abstractThere is a growing demand for human organs for transplantation, particularly of the kidney among the UK's South Asian population which, due to problems with histocompatibility can only be met with a significant increase in the number of Asian donors. Specific attempts have only recently been made to attract donors from South Asian communities using 'ethnically-targeted mass media'. A recent pilot study sought to evaluate the effectiveness of these initiatives in providing information with regards to organ donation for the South Asian population. The findings show that detailed information related to transplantation activity had been learned only through the experience of people undergoing transplants within the community and has been transmitted through various informal networks rather than through the resources provided by the Department of Health. This paper provides an overview of who the South Asians are and how these community networks were established.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean Renal Care Associationen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10418370en_GB
dc.subjectorgan donationen_GB
dc.subjecttransplantationen_GB
dc.subjectAsiansen_GB
dc.subject.meshCommunity Networks-
dc.subject.meshEmigration and Immigration-
dc.subject.meshGreat Britain-
dc.subject.meshHealth Education-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshIndia-
dc.subject.meshMass Media-
dc.subject.meshPilot Projects-
dc.subject.meshProgram Evaluation-
dc.subject.meshTissue Donors-
dc.subject.meshTissue and Organ Procurement-
dc.titleInforming the UK's South Asian communities on organ donation and transplantationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Lutonen_GB
dc.identifier.journalEDTNA/ERCA journal (English ed.)en_GB

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