An exploratory study examining attitudes toward mental health and mental health services among young south Asians in the United Kingdom

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/237602
Title:
An exploratory study examining attitudes toward mental health and mental health services among young south Asians in the United Kingdom
Authors:
Randhawa, Gurch ( 0000-0002-2289-5859 ) ; Stein, Samuel
Abstract:
Research findings to date highlight the underutilization of mental health services by minority ethnic families. However, research in this area has been adult focused and concentrated on the views of parents. This study therefore seeks to redress that imbalance within the research arena by making children the focus of consultation on mental health issues. The article presents results from an exploratory study, commissioned by the Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents, to explore the views of young South Asians in Luton and Bedford toward mental health and mental health services. Overall, only one in five of the respondents was aware of clinics available to support children, adolescents, or families who are experiencing emotional or behavioral difficulties. The role of schools emerged to be potentially very influential in the study. Schools were seen as a focal point from which young people could gain information regarding support services, and were also perceived as a good venue from which to offer clinics. In this study, 65% of the young respondents who stated they would not access a support clinic to assist them with their difficulties were of South Asian origin. Similarly, 66% of the respondents who stated that their friends or family were unlikely to use the clinic for support were of South Asian origin. Notably, however, the level of awareness of services was the same across all ethnic groups. Therefore, the difference in the proposed use of services was not lack of awareness, but instead that the South Asian respondents felt more strongly about not wanting to share their problems with “strangers.”
Citation:
Randhawa, G. and Stein, S. (2007) 'An exploratory study examining attitudes toward mental health and mental health services among young South Asians in the United Kingdom, Journal of Muslim Mental Health, 2 (1)pp.21-37
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Journal of Muslim Mental Health
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/237602
DOI:
10.1080/15564900701238518
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15564900701238518
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1556-4908; 1556-5009
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRandhawa, Gurchen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStein, Samuelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-07T14:39:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-07T14:39:25Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationRandhawa, G. and Stein, S. (2007) 'An exploratory study examining attitudes toward mental health and mental health services among young South Asians in the United Kingdom, Journal of Muslim Mental Health, 2 (1)pp.21-37en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1556-4908-
dc.identifier.issn1556-5009-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/15564900701238518-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/237602-
dc.description.abstractResearch findings to date highlight the underutilization of mental health services by minority ethnic families. However, research in this area has been adult focused and concentrated on the views of parents. This study therefore seeks to redress that imbalance within the research arena by making children the focus of consultation on mental health issues. The article presents results from an exploratory study, commissioned by the Association for Professionals in Services for Adolescents, to explore the views of young South Asians in Luton and Bedford toward mental health and mental health services. Overall, only one in five of the respondents was aware of clinics available to support children, adolescents, or families who are experiencing emotional or behavioral difficulties. The role of schools emerged to be potentially very influential in the study. Schools were seen as a focal point from which young people could gain information regarding support services, and were also perceived as a good venue from which to offer clinics. In this study, 65% of the young respondents who stated they would not access a support clinic to assist them with their difficulties were of South Asian origin. Similarly, 66% of the respondents who stated that their friends or family were unlikely to use the clinic for support were of South Asian origin. Notably, however, the level of awareness of services was the same across all ethnic groups. Therefore, the difference in the proposed use of services was not lack of awareness, but instead that the South Asian respondents felt more strongly about not wanting to share their problems with “strangers.”en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15564900701238518en_GB
dc.subjectethnicityen_GB
dc.subjectmental healthen_GB
dc.subjectmental health servicesen_GB
dc.subjectSouth Asiansen_GB
dc.titleAn exploratory study examining attitudes toward mental health and mental health services among young south Asians in the United Kingdomen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Muslim Mental Healthen_GB
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