Work stressors, social support, and burnout in junior doctors: exploring direct and indirect pathways

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/235397
Title:
Work stressors, social support, and burnout in junior doctors: exploring direct and indirect pathways
Authors:
Sochos, Antigonos; Bowers, Alexis; Kinman, Gail
Abstract:
The study tested a pathway model linking different occupational stressors, different sources of social support, and burnout. A sample of 184 junior medical doctors was used. Pathway analysis suggested that doctors who experienced increased time demands, organizational constraints, and a lack of personal confidence perceived their consultants as less supportive, whereas those who experienced greater clinical responsibility perceived their supervisors as more supportive. A lack of support from coworkers was linked with a lack of support from consultants, top management, and family. The perception of consultant support was linked with lower burnout, whereas the perception of coworker support was linked with higher burnout. The present findings may inform interventions aimed to support junior doctors experiencing burnout.
Citation:
Sochos, A. & Bone, A. (2012) 'Work Stressors, Social Support, and Burnout in Junior Doctors: Exploring Direct and Indirect Pathways' Journal of Employment Counseling, 49(2) pp.62-73
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of Employment Counseling
Issue Date:
24-Jul-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/235397
DOI:
10.1002/j.2161-1920.2012.00007.x
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/j.2161-1920.2012.00007.x
Language:
en
ISSN:
00220787
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research; Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSochos, Antigonosen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBowers, Alexisen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-07-24T08:27:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-07-24T08:27:24Z-
dc.date.issued2012-07-24-
dc.identifier.citationSochos, A. & Bone, A. (2012) 'Work Stressors, Social Support, and Burnout in Junior Doctors: Exploring Direct and Indirect Pathways' Journal of Employment Counseling, 49(2) pp.62-73en_GB
dc.identifier.issn00220787-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/j.2161-1920.2012.00007.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/235397-
dc.description.abstractThe study tested a pathway model linking different occupational stressors, different sources of social support, and burnout. A sample of 184 junior medical doctors was used. Pathway analysis suggested that doctors who experienced increased time demands, organizational constraints, and a lack of personal confidence perceived their consultants as less supportive, whereas those who experienced greater clinical responsibility perceived their supervisors as more supportive. A lack of support from coworkers was linked with a lack of support from consultants, top management, and family. The perception of consultant support was linked with lower burnout, whereas the perception of coworker support was linked with higher burnout. The present findings may inform interventions aimed to support junior doctors experiencing burnout.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/j.2161-1920.2012.00007.xen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Employment Counselingen_GB
dc.subjectoccupational stressen_GB
dc.subjectburnouten_GB
dc.subjectjunior doctorsen_GB
dc.subjectsupporten_GB
dc.titleWork stressors, social support, and burnout in junior doctors: exploring direct and indirect pathwaysen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Employment Counselingen_GB
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