Readiness for legally literate medical practice? Student perceptions of their undergraduate medico-legal education

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/229371
Title:
Readiness for legally literate medical practice? Student perceptions of their undergraduate medico-legal education
Authors:
Preston-Shoot, Michael ( 0000-0002-9347-0524 ) ; McKimm, Judy; Kong, Wing May; Smith, Sue
Abstract:
Medical councils increasingly require graduates to understand law and to practise medicine mindful of the legal rules. In the UK a revised curriculum for medical law and ethics has been published. However, coverage of law in medical education remains variable and doubts exist about how far students acquire legal knowledge and skills in its implementation. This survey of students in two UK medical schools measured their law learning and their confidence in using this knowledge. Concept maps and a self-audit questionnaire were used to capture students' understanding and perceptions of this knowledge domain and self-assessments of their legal knowledge and skills. A large sample was achieved across first, second and final year students. Students agree that a sound understanding of law is essential to being a good doctor. Their perceptions of law are generally positive but the interface between the legal rules and codes of medical ethics creates difficulty. In some areas students offer relatively confident self-assessments of their legal knowledge and skills for practising law. However, levels of confidence in other areas of their law learning raise doubts about the degree to which they can advocate for and protect their patients. Conclusions are drawn about the effectiveness of students' law learning and recommendations made for further research.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire; Unitec New Zealand; Imperial College, London; National Heart and Lung Institute
Citation:
Preston-Shoot, M., McKimm, J., Kong, W.M., Smith, S. (2011) 'Readiness for legally literate medical practice? Student perceptions of their undergraduate medico-legal education', Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (10):616
Publisher:
BMJ
Journal:
Journal of Medical Ethics
Issue Date:
May-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/229371
DOI:
10.1136/jme.2010.041566
Additional Links:
http://jme.bmj.com/cgi/doi/10.1136/jme.2010.041566
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0306-6800
Appears in Collections:
Social Work, Professional Practice and the Law

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPreston-Shoot, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcKimm, Judyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKong, Wing Mayen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Sueen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-18T08:24:40Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-18T08:24:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-05-
dc.identifier.citationPreston-Shoot, M., McKimm, J., Kong, W.M., Smith, S. (2011) 'Readiness for legally literate medical practice? Student perceptions of their undergraduate medico-legal education', Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (10):616en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0306-6800-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jme.2010.041566-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/229371-
dc.description.abstractMedical councils increasingly require graduates to understand law and to practise medicine mindful of the legal rules. In the UK a revised curriculum for medical law and ethics has been published. However, coverage of law in medical education remains variable and doubts exist about how far students acquire legal knowledge and skills in its implementation. This survey of students in two UK medical schools measured their law learning and their confidence in using this knowledge. Concept maps and a self-audit questionnaire were used to capture students' understanding and perceptions of this knowledge domain and self-assessments of their legal knowledge and skills. A large sample was achieved across first, second and final year students. Students agree that a sound understanding of law is essential to being a good doctor. Their perceptions of law are generally positive but the interface between the legal rules and codes of medical ethics creates difficulty. In some areas students offer relatively confident self-assessments of their legal knowledge and skills for practising law. However, levels of confidence in other areas of their law learning raise doubts about the degree to which they can advocate for and protect their patients. Conclusions are drawn about the effectiveness of students' law learning and recommendations made for further research.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://jme.bmj.com/cgi/doi/10.1136/jme.2010.041566en_GB
dc.subjectmedico-legal educationen
dc.subjectmedical lawen
dc.titleReadiness for legally literate medical practice? Student perceptions of their undergraduate medico-legal educationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentUnitec New Zealanden
dc.contributor.departmentImperial College, Londonen
dc.contributor.departmentNational Heart and Lung Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Medical Ethicsen_GB
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