The consequences of nuclear transfer for mammalian foetal development and offspring survival : a mitochondrial DNA perspective

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/228315
Title:
The consequences of nuclear transfer for mammalian foetal development and offspring survival : a mitochondrial DNA perspective
Authors:
St John, Justin C.; Lloyd, Rhiannon E.I.; Bowles, Emma J.; Thomas, Emma C.; El Shourbagy, Shahinaz H.
Abstract:
The introduction of nuclear transfer (NT) and other technologies that involve embryo reconstruction require us to reinvestigate patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transmission, transcription and replication. MtDNA is a 16.6 kb genome located within each mitochondrion. The number of mitochondria and mtDNA copies per organelle is specific to each cell type. MtDNA is normally transmitted through the oocyte to the offspring. However, reconstructed oocytes often transmit both recipient oocyte mtDNA and mtDNA associated with the donor nucleus. We argue that the transmission of two populations of mtDNA may have implications for offspring survival as only one allele might be actively transcribed. This could result in the offspring phenotypically exhibiting mtDNA depletion-type syndromes. A similar occurrence could arise when nucleo-cytoplasmic interactions fail to regulate mtDNA transcription and replication, especially as the initiation of mtDNA replication post-implantation is a key developmental event. Furthermore, failure of the donor somatic nucleus to be reprogrammed could result in the early initiation of replication and the loss of cellular mtDNA specificity. We suggest investigations should be conducted to enhance our understanding of nucleo-cytoplasmic interactions in order to improve NT efficiency.
Affiliation:
Mitochondrial and Reproductive Genetics Group, Division of Medical Sciences, Medical School, University of Birmingham
Citation:
St John, J.C., Lloyd, R.E.I., Bowles, E.J., Thomas, E.C., El Shourbagy, S.H. (2004) 'The consequences of nuclear transfer for mammalian foetal development and offspring survival. A mitochondrial DNA perspective', Reproduction 127 (6):631-41
Publisher:
Society for Reproduction and Fertility
Journal:
Reproduction (Cambridge, England)
Issue Date:
Jun-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/228315
DOI:
10.1530/rep.1.00138
PubMed ID:
15175500
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15175500
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
Review of the article
ISSN:
1470-1626
Appears in Collections:
Cell and Cryobiology Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSt John, Justin C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLloyd, Rhiannon E.I.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBowles, Emma J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Emma C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorEl Shourbagy, Shahinaz H.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-11T10:22:12Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-11T10:22:12Z-
dc.date.issued2004-06-
dc.identifier.citationSt John, J.C., Lloyd, R.E.I., Bowles, E.J., Thomas, E.C., El Shourbagy, S.H. (2004) 'The consequences of nuclear transfer for mammalian foetal development and offspring survival. A mitochondrial DNA perspective', Reproduction 127 (6):631-41en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1470-1626-
dc.identifier.pmid15175500-
dc.identifier.doi10.1530/rep.1.00138-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/228315-
dc.descriptionReview of the articleen_GB
dc.description.abstractThe introduction of nuclear transfer (NT) and other technologies that involve embryo reconstruction require us to reinvestigate patterns of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) transmission, transcription and replication. MtDNA is a 16.6 kb genome located within each mitochondrion. The number of mitochondria and mtDNA copies per organelle is specific to each cell type. MtDNA is normally transmitted through the oocyte to the offspring. However, reconstructed oocytes often transmit both recipient oocyte mtDNA and mtDNA associated with the donor nucleus. We argue that the transmission of two populations of mtDNA may have implications for offspring survival as only one allele might be actively transcribed. This could result in the offspring phenotypically exhibiting mtDNA depletion-type syndromes. A similar occurrence could arise when nucleo-cytoplasmic interactions fail to regulate mtDNA transcription and replication, especially as the initiation of mtDNA replication post-implantation is a key developmental event. Furthermore, failure of the donor somatic nucleus to be reprogrammed could result in the early initiation of replication and the loss of cellular mtDNA specificity. We suggest investigations should be conducted to enhance our understanding of nucleo-cytoplasmic interactions in order to improve NT efficiency.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSociety for Reproduction and Fertilityen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15175500en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Reproduction (Cambridge, England)en_GB
dc.subjectnuclear transferen_GB
dc.subjectmitochondrial DNAen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdenosine Triphosphate-
dc.subject.meshAlleles-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAnimals, Newborn-
dc.subject.meshCell Differentiation-
dc.subject.meshCell Nucleus-
dc.subject.meshCytoplasm-
dc.subject.meshDNA Replication-
dc.subject.meshDNA, Mitochondrial-
dc.subject.meshEmbryonic and Fetal Development-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshMammals-
dc.subject.meshNuclear Transfer Techniques-
dc.subject.meshTranscription, Genetic-
dc.titleThe consequences of nuclear transfer for mammalian foetal development and offspring survival : a mitochondrial DNA perspectiveen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMitochondrial and Reproductive Genetics Group, Division of Medical Sciences, Medical School, University of Birminghamen_GB
dc.identifier.journalReproduction (Cambridge, England)en_GB

Related articles on PubMed

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.