The relationship between bullying roles and children's everyday dyadic interactions

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/226915
Title:
The relationship between bullying roles and children's everyday dyadic interactions
Authors:
Murphy, Suzanne; Faulkner, Dorothy
Abstract:
This study investigated the behaviour and communication of seven- to eight-year-old children during a dyadic computer task. The children participating were identified by peers as: (1) initiators of bullying (‘bullies’); (2) defenders of those victimised (‘defenders’); and (3) those who generally do not take on a consistent role in relation to bullying (‘non-role’ children). Children were videotaped during the task and the interaction was coded, 34 dyads participated. Defenders used significantly higher levels of supportive communication such as explanation and guidance than bullies. The task performance of dyads consisting of defenders with non-role children was significantly superior to that of dyads comprising bullies plus non-role children. The behaviour of the non-role children was influenced according to whether they were working with a bully, a defender or another non-role child. The study suggests that the roles that children adopt in relation to bullying influence their behaviour in other, non-bullying contexts.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire; Open University
Citation:
Murphy, S., Faulkner, D. (2011) 'The relationship between bullying roles and children's everyday dyadic interactions', Social Development, 20 (2), pp.272-293.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Social Development
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/226915
DOI:
10.1111/j.1467-9507.2010.00597.x
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9507.2010.00597.x/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Suzanneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFaulkner, Dorothyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-31T13:47:15Zen
dc.date.available2012-05-31T13:47:15Zen
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationMurphy, S., Faulkner, D. (2011) 'The relationship between bullying roles and children's everyday dyadic interactions', Social Development, 20 (2), pp.272-293.en_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1467-9507.2010.00597.xen_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/226915en
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the behaviour and communication of seven- to eight-year-old children during a dyadic computer task. The children participating were identified by peers as: (1) initiators of bullying (‘bullies’); (2) defenders of those victimised (‘defenders’); and (3) those who generally do not take on a consistent role in relation to bullying (‘non-role’ children). Children were videotaped during the task and the interaction was coded, 34 dyads participated. Defenders used significantly higher levels of supportive communication such as explanation and guidance than bullies. The task performance of dyads consisting of defenders with non-role children was significantly superior to that of dyads comprising bullies plus non-role children. The behaviour of the non-role children was influenced according to whether they were working with a bully, a defender or another non-role child. The study suggests that the roles that children adopt in relation to bullying influence their behaviour in other, non-bullying contexts.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-9507.2010.00597.x/abstracten
dc.subjectdevelopmental psychologyen_GB
dc.subjectbullyingen_GB
dc.subjectinteractionen_GB
dc.subjectverbal communicationen_GB
dc.subjectbullyingen_GB
dc.titleThe relationship between bullying roles and children's everyday dyadic interactionsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.contributor.departmentOpen Universityen_GB
dc.identifier.journalSocial Developmenten_GB
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