A psychophysiological investigation of laterality in human emotion elicited by pleasant and unpleasant film clips

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/226013
Title:
A psychophysiological investigation of laterality in human emotion elicited by pleasant and unpleasant film clips
Authors:
Kaviani, Hossein; Kumari, Veena; Wilson, Glenn D
Abstract:
Background Research on laterality in emotion suggests a dichotomy between the brain hemispheres. The present study aimed to investigate this further using a modulated startle reflex paradigm. Methods We examined the effects of left and the right ear stimulation on the modulated startle reflex (as indexed by eyeblink magnitude, measured from the right eye) employing short (2 min) film clips to elicit emotions in 16 right-handed healthy participants. The experiment consisted of two consecutive sessions on a single occasion. The acoustic startle probes were presented monaurally to one of the ears in each session, counterbalanced across order, during the viewing of film clips. Results The findings showed that eyeblink amplitude in relation to acoustic startle probes varied linearly, as expected, from pleasant through neutral to unpleasant film clips, but there was no interaction between monaural probe side and foreground valence. Conclusions Our data indicate the involvement of both hemispheres when affective states, and associated startle modulations, are produced, using materials with both audio and visual properties. From a methodological viewpoint, the robustness of film clip material including audio properties might compensate for the insufficient information reaching the ipsilateral hemisphere when using static pictures. From a theoretical viewpoint, a right ear advantage for verbal processing may account for the failure to detect the expected hemispheric difference. The verbal component of the clips would have activated the left hemisphere, possibly resulting in an increased role for the left hemisphere in both positive and negative affect generation.
Citation:
Kaviani, H., Kumari, V. & Wilson, G.D. (2010) 'A psychophysiological investigation of laterality in human emotion elicited by pleasant and unpleasant film clips', Annals of General Psychiatry, 9(1), p.38.
Journal:
Annals of General Psychiatry
Issue Date:
25-May-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/226013
DOI:
10.1186/1744-859X-9-38
Additional Links:
http://www.annals-general-psychiatry.com/content/9/1/38
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1744-859X
Appears in Collections:
Research Centre for Applied Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKaviani, Hosseinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKumari, Veenaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Glenn Den_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-25T13:27:08Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-25T13:27:08Z-
dc.date.issued2012-05-25-
dc.identifier.citationKaviani, H., Kumari, V. & Wilson, G.D. (2010) 'A psychophysiological investigation of laterality in human emotion elicited by pleasant and unpleasant film clips', Annals of General Psychiatry, 9(1), p.38.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1744-859X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1744-859X-9-38-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/226013-
dc.description.abstractBackground Research on laterality in emotion suggests a dichotomy between the brain hemispheres. The present study aimed to investigate this further using a modulated startle reflex paradigm. Methods We examined the effects of left and the right ear stimulation on the modulated startle reflex (as indexed by eyeblink magnitude, measured from the right eye) employing short (2 min) film clips to elicit emotions in 16 right-handed healthy participants. The experiment consisted of two consecutive sessions on a single occasion. The acoustic startle probes were presented monaurally to one of the ears in each session, counterbalanced across order, during the viewing of film clips. Results The findings showed that eyeblink amplitude in relation to acoustic startle probes varied linearly, as expected, from pleasant through neutral to unpleasant film clips, but there was no interaction between monaural probe side and foreground valence. Conclusions Our data indicate the involvement of both hemispheres when affective states, and associated startle modulations, are produced, using materials with both audio and visual properties. From a methodological viewpoint, the robustness of film clip material including audio properties might compensate for the insufficient information reaching the ipsilateral hemisphere when using static pictures. From a theoretical viewpoint, a right ear advantage for verbal processing may account for the failure to detect the expected hemispheric difference. The verbal component of the clips would have activated the left hemisphere, possibly resulting in an increased role for the left hemisphere in both positive and negative affect generation.en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.annals-general-psychiatry.com/content/9/1/38en_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Annals of General Psychiatryen_GB
dc.subjectemotionen_GB
dc.subjectbrain lateralisationen_GB
dc.titleA psychophysiological investigation of laterality in human emotion elicited by pleasant and unpleasant film clips-
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalAnnals of General Psychiatryen_GB
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