2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/225638
Title:
Oxidant stress in healthy normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals.
Authors:
Brown, Louise A.; Kerr, Catherine J.; Whiting, Paul; Finer, Nicholas; McEneny, Jane; Ashton, Tony
Abstract:
This study was undertaken to investigate the association among BMI and lipid hydroperoxide (LH), total antioxidant status (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH). Ninety (n = 90) healthy males and females (n = 23/67) (29 normal weight (BMI: 22.74 +/- 0.25 kg/m(2)), 36 overweight (BMI: 27.18 +/- 0.23 kg/m(2)), and 25 obese (33.78 +/- 0.48 kg/m(2))) participated in the study. Data collected included anthropometric measures, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, LH, TAS, and enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, and reduced GSH). The results of the study showed that obese individuals had significantly increased LH levels compared to normal-weight individuals (obese vs. normal weight (0.88 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.67 +/- 0.03 micromol/l, P < 0.01)) but the increased levels were not significantly different when compared to the overweight group (obese vs. overweight (0.88 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.79 +/- 0.05 micromol/l)). No other consistent significant differences in TAS, SOD, and GSH were identified between groups. This study concluded that only obesity and not moderate overweight elevates LH levels. Furthermore, the levels of TAS, SOD, and GSH in obesity do not explain the increased LH levels observed in obesity.
Affiliation:
School of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Brown, L.A., Kerr, C.J., Whiting, P., Finer, N., McEneny, J. and Ashton, T. (2009) 'Oxidant stress in healthy normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals', Obesity, 17(3) pp.460-466.
Journal:
Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)
Issue Date:
Mar-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/225638
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2008.590
PubMed ID:
19131942
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1038/oby.2008.590/abstract;jsessionid=E42199CE0E33D3B29BA0331C65AC4115.f02t01
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1930-7381
Appears in Collections:
Physical Activity and Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Louise A.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Catherine J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhiting, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFiner, Nicholasen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcEneny, Janeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAshton, Tonyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T15:44:30Zen
dc.date.available2012-05-23T15:44:30Zen
dc.date.issued2009-03en
dc.identifier.citationBrown, L.A., Kerr, C.J., Whiting, P., Finer, N., McEneny, J. and Ashton, T. (2009) 'Oxidant stress in healthy normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals', Obesity, 17(3) pp.460-466.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1930-7381en
dc.identifier.pmid19131942en
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/oby.2008.590en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/225638en
dc.description.abstractThis study was undertaken to investigate the association among BMI and lipid hydroperoxide (LH), total antioxidant status (TAS), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and reduced glutathione (GSH). Ninety (n = 90) healthy males and females (n = 23/67) (29 normal weight (BMI: 22.74 +/- 0.25 kg/m(2)), 36 overweight (BMI: 27.18 +/- 0.23 kg/m(2)), and 25 obese (33.78 +/- 0.48 kg/m(2))) participated in the study. Data collected included anthropometric measures, fasting blood glucose, lipid profile, LH, TAS, and enzymatic antioxidants (SOD, and reduced GSH). The results of the study showed that obese individuals had significantly increased LH levels compared to normal-weight individuals (obese vs. normal weight (0.88 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.67 +/- 0.03 micromol/l, P < 0.01)) but the increased levels were not significantly different when compared to the overweight group (obese vs. overweight (0.88 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.79 +/- 0.05 micromol/l)). No other consistent significant differences in TAS, SOD, and GSH were identified between groups. This study concluded that only obesity and not moderate overweight elevates LH levels. Furthermore, the levels of TAS, SOD, and GSH in obesity do not explain the increased LH levels observed in obesity.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1038/oby.2008.590/abstract;jsessionid=E42199CE0E33D3B29BA0331C65AC4115.f02t01en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Obesity (Silver Spring, Md.)en_GB
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAntioxidantsen
dc.subject.meshBlood Glucoseen
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGlutathioneen
dc.subject.meshHealthen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshLipid Peroxidesen
dc.subject.meshLipidsen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshObesityen
dc.subject.meshOverweighten
dc.subject.meshOxidative Stressen
dc.subject.meshSuperoxide Dismutaseen
dc.titleOxidant stress in healthy normal-weight, overweight, and obese individuals.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Bedfordshireen_GB
dc.identifier.journalObesity (Silver Spring, Md.)en_GB

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