An investigation into the possible physiological mechanisms associated with changes in performance related to acute responses to different preactivity stretch modalities.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/225612
Title:
An investigation into the possible physiological mechanisms associated with changes in performance related to acute responses to different preactivity stretch modalities.
Authors:
Fletcher, Iain M.; Monte-Colombo, Mathew M.
Abstract:
The aim of this study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying performance changes linked to different warm-up stretch modalities. Twenty-one male collegiate-semiprofessional soccer players (age, 20.8 +/- 2.3 years) performed under 3 different warm-up conditions: a no-stretch warm-up (WU), a warm-up including static passive stretches (SPS), and a warm-up incorporating static dynamic stretches (SDS). Countermovement jump, drop jump, peak torque, heart rate, core temperature, movement kinematics, and electromyography (EMG) were recorded for each intervention. Significant increases (p < 0.001) in performance were recorded for the countermovement, drop jump, and peak torque measures when the SDS was compared with the WU and SPS trials. When mechanism data were analysed, heart rate was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the SDS condition compared with the SPS and WU conditions (a pattern also shown with core temperature), whereas the WU condition heart rate was also significantly higher than the SPS condition heart rate. When EMG data were examined for the rectus femoris muscle, significantly greater (p < 0.01) muscle activity was observed in the SDS condition compared with the SPS condition. It seems the most likely mechanisms to explain the increase in performance in the SDS condition compared with the SPS condition are increased heart rate, greater muscle activity, and increased peak torque.
Affiliation:
Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Bedfordshire, Bedford, MK41 9EA, UK. iain.fletcher@beds.ac.uk
Citation:
Fletcher, I.M., and Monte-Colombo, M.M. 'An investigation into the possible physiological mechanisms associated with changes in performance related to acute responses to different preactivity stretch modalities' Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism, 35(1) pp.27-34
Journal:
Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquée, nutrition et métabolisme
Issue Date:
Feb-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/225612
DOI:
10.1139/H09-125
PubMed ID:
20130663
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1715-5312
Appears in Collections:
Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Iain M.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMonte-Colombo, Mathew M.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-23T14:16:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-23T14:16:55Z-
dc.date.issued2010-02-
dc.identifier.citationFletcher, I.M., and Monte-Colombo, M.M. 'An investigation into the possible physiological mechanisms associated with changes in performance related to acute responses to different preactivity stretch modalities' Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism, 35(1) pp.27-34en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1715-5312-
dc.identifier.pmid20130663-
dc.identifier.doi10.1139/H09-125-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/225612-
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to explore the potential mechanisms underlying performance changes linked to different warm-up stretch modalities. Twenty-one male collegiate-semiprofessional soccer players (age, 20.8 +/- 2.3 years) performed under 3 different warm-up conditions: a no-stretch warm-up (WU), a warm-up including static passive stretches (SPS), and a warm-up incorporating static dynamic stretches (SDS). Countermovement jump, drop jump, peak torque, heart rate, core temperature, movement kinematics, and electromyography (EMG) were recorded for each intervention. Significant increases (p < 0.001) in performance were recorded for the countermovement, drop jump, and peak torque measures when the SDS was compared with the WU and SPS trials. When mechanism data were analysed, heart rate was significantly higher (p < 0.001) in the SDS condition compared with the SPS and WU conditions (a pattern also shown with core temperature), whereas the WU condition heart rate was also significantly higher than the SPS condition heart rate. When EMG data were examined for the rectus femoris muscle, significantly greater (p < 0.01) muscle activity was observed in the SDS condition compared with the SPS condition. It seems the most likely mechanisms to explain the increase in performance in the SDS condition compared with the SPS condition are increased heart rate, greater muscle activity, and increased peak torque.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Applied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquée, nutrition et métabolismeen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subject.meshAthletic Performance-
dc.subject.meshBody Temperature-
dc.subject.meshElectromyography-
dc.subject.meshHeart Rate-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshKinetics-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMuscle Strength-
dc.subject.meshMuscle Stretching Exercises-
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletal-
dc.subject.meshRange of Motion, Articular-
dc.subject.meshReference Values-
dc.subject.meshSoccer-
dc.subject.meshTorque-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleAn investigation into the possible physiological mechanisms associated with changes in performance related to acute responses to different preactivity stretch modalities.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Bedfordshire, Bedford, MK41 9EA, UK. iain.fletcher@beds.ac.uken_GB
dc.identifier.journalApplied physiology, nutrition, and metabolism = Physiologie appliquée, nutrition et métabolismeen_GB

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