Global points of ‘vulnerability’: understanding processes of the trafficking of children and young people into, within and out of the UK

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/224915
Title:
Global points of ‘vulnerability’: understanding processes of the trafficking of children and young people into, within and out of the UK
Authors:
Hynes, Patricia ( 0000-0001-8830-0603 )
Abstract:
Within the UK, trafficking of children and young people into, within and out of the country has become an increasingly important and debated issue over the past decade. Although not a new phenomenon, human trafficking has risen up the policy agendas of many countries since the end of the Cold War. This type of forced migration is inextricably linked to the promotion and protection of human rights – be they civil, political, social, economic or cultural rights – and as such it is important that the broader social processes involved are understood and researched by sociologists. This contribution draws upon qualitative research into practitioner responses to trafficking of children conducted by the University of Bedfordshire and the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) in the UK. A key finding of this study was that trafficking of children is often viewed as a one-off ‘event’ by those who have a duty to care for children and young people. It is argued that viewing trafficking as a broader sociological process rather than an event enables a greater understanding of the environmental backgrounds of individual children and the human rights contexts within countries of origin as well as subsequent migration trajectories. It is suggested that this may lead to an enhanced ability to identify children as having been trafficked by those with a duty to care for children. The literature from the multidisciplinary fields of refugee studies and forced migration is drawn upon where applicable.
Citation:
Hynes, P. (2010) 'Global points of ‘vulnerability’: understanding processes of the trafficking of children and young people into, within and out of the UK'. The International Journal of Human Rights 14 (6):952
Journal:
The International Journal of Human Rights
Issue Date:
21-May-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/224915
DOI:
10.1080/13642987.2010.512140
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13642987.2010.512140
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1364-2987; 1744-053X
Appears in Collections:
International Centre for the Study of Sexually Exploited and Trafficked Children and Young People

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHynes, Patriciaen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-21T10:18:05Zen
dc.date.available2012-05-21T10:18:05Zen
dc.date.issued2012-05-21en
dc.identifier.citationHynes, P. (2010) 'Global points of ‘vulnerability’: understanding processes of the trafficking of children and young people into, within and out of the UK'. The International Journal of Human Rights 14 (6):952en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1364-2987en
dc.identifier.issn1744-053Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13642987.2010.512140en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/224915en
dc.description.abstractWithin the UK, trafficking of children and young people into, within and out of the country has become an increasingly important and debated issue over the past decade. Although not a new phenomenon, human trafficking has risen up the policy agendas of many countries since the end of the Cold War. This type of forced migration is inextricably linked to the promotion and protection of human rights – be they civil, political, social, economic or cultural rights – and as such it is important that the broader social processes involved are understood and researched by sociologists. This contribution draws upon qualitative research into practitioner responses to trafficking of children conducted by the University of Bedfordshire and the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) in the UK. A key finding of this study was that trafficking of children is often viewed as a one-off ‘event’ by those who have a duty to care for children and young people. It is argued that viewing trafficking as a broader sociological process rather than an event enables a greater understanding of the environmental backgrounds of individual children and the human rights contexts within countries of origin as well as subsequent migration trajectories. It is suggested that this may lead to an enhanced ability to identify children as having been trafficked by those with a duty to care for children. The literature from the multidisciplinary fields of refugee studies and forced migration is drawn upon where applicable.en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13642987.2010.512140en_GB
dc.subjecttraffickingen_GB
dc.subjectchildrenen_GB
dc.subjectyoung peopleen_GB
dc.subjectforced migrationen_GB
dc.subjecthuman rightsen_GB
dc.subjectvulnerabilityen_GB
dc.titleGlobal points of ‘vulnerability’: understanding processes of the trafficking of children and young people into, within and out of the UKen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalThe International Journal of Human Rightsen_GB
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.