2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/224573
Title:
Immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia: development of a whole cell vaccine.
Authors:
Cheuk, Adam T.C.; Guinn, Barbara-Ann
Abstract:
Acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a difficult to treat disease and strategies, such as immunotherapy, which have the potential to eliminate residual tumour cells at first remission are required to reduce the incidence of relapse with its high associated mortality rates. T cells play an important role in tumor immunity and two signals are traditionally thought to be required to activate naive T cells; signal one through the major histocompatibility:antigen:T-cell receptor complex and signal two through costimulation. Many tumor associated antigens have been identified in AML suggesting it may be possible to target the immune system of AML patients; however AML develops due to tumour and immune editing, two systems by which AML cells can escape immune surveillance. By genetically modifying AML cells to express costimulatory molecules and/or cytokines, it has been possible to transform AML cells into antigen presenting cells and this has the potential to re-activate the immune system in patients. Here we summarize the rationale for using a whole cell vaccine approach to treat AML, and discuss current progress in the field of whole cell vaccine development against AML.
Affiliation:
Department of Haematological Medicine, King's College London School of Medicine, The Rayne Institute, 123 Coldharbour Lane, London, SE5 9NU, United Kingdom.
Citation:
Cheuk, A. & Guinn, B. (2008) 'Immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia: development of a whole cell vaccine', Frontiers in Bioscience: a journal and virtual library, 13, pp.2022-2029.
Publisher:
bioscience.org
Journal:
Frontiers in Bioscience : a journal and virtual library 13, pp.2022-2029.
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/224573
PubMed ID:
17981688
Additional Links:
http://www.bioscience.org/2008/v13/af/2820/fulltext.htm
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1093-4715
Sponsors:
leukaemia and lymphoma research
Appears in Collections:
Biomedicine and Nutrition Research Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCheuk, Adam T.C.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuinn, Barbara-Annen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-18T10:13:11Z-
dc.date.available2012-05-18T10:13:11Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationCheuk, A. & Guinn, B. (2008) 'Immunotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia: development of a whole cell vaccine', Frontiers in Bioscience: a journal and virtual library, 13, pp.2022-2029.en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1093-4715-
dc.identifier.pmid17981688-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/224573-
dc.description.abstractAcute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is a difficult to treat disease and strategies, such as immunotherapy, which have the potential to eliminate residual tumour cells at first remission are required to reduce the incidence of relapse with its high associated mortality rates. T cells play an important role in tumor immunity and two signals are traditionally thought to be required to activate naive T cells; signal one through the major histocompatibility:antigen:T-cell receptor complex and signal two through costimulation. Many tumor associated antigens have been identified in AML suggesting it may be possible to target the immune system of AML patients; however AML develops due to tumour and immune editing, two systems by which AML cells can escape immune surveillance. By genetically modifying AML cells to express costimulatory molecules and/or cytokines, it has been possible to transform AML cells into antigen presenting cells and this has the potential to re-activate the immune system in patients. Here we summarize the rationale for using a whole cell vaccine approach to treat AML, and discuss current progress in the field of whole cell vaccine development against AML.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipleukaemia and lymphoma researchen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherbioscience.orgen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.bioscience.org/2008/v13/af/2820/fulltext.htmen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Frontiers in bioscience : a journal and virtual libraryen_GB
dc.subjectimmunotherapyen_GB
dc.subjectacute myeloid leukaemiaen_GB
dc.subjectwhole cell vaccineen_GB
dc.subject.mesh4-1BB Ligand-
dc.subject.meshAnimals-
dc.subject.meshAntigen-Presenting Cells-
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD80-
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD86-
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Neoplasm-
dc.subject.meshCancer Vaccines-
dc.subject.meshCytokines-
dc.subject.meshGene Therapy-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshImmune System-
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy-
dc.subject.meshLeukemia, Myeloid, Acute-
dc.subject.meshMice-
dc.titleImmunotherapy of acute myeloid leukaemia: development of a whole cell vaccine.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Haematological Medicine, King's College London School of Medicine, The Rayne Institute, 123 Coldharbour Lane, London, SE5 9NU, United Kingdom.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Bioscience : a journal and virtual library 13, pp.2022-2029.en_GB

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