Real bad girls : the origins and nature of offending by girls and young women involved with a county youth offending team and systemic responses to them

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/135244
Title:
Real bad girls : the origins and nature of offending by girls and young women involved with a county youth offending team and systemic responses to them
Authors:
Williams, Jeanette Deborah
Abstract:
Amidst growing concerns about a rise in girls entering the Youth Justice System and official data highlighting increases in girls violent offending this doctoral thesis focuses on girls in the Youth Justice System. Drawing on case files and in depth interviews with a cohort of girls supervised by a Home Counties Youth Offending Team (YOT), and interviews with YOT practitioners it explores their needs and offending patterns and examines contemporary system responses to them. It aims to contribute to practice knowledge and understanding about girls offending, and to identify approaches and interventions most likely to be effective with them. Findings point to girls having multiple and interrelated needs and troubled backgrounds. Exclusion from school and non attendance, experience of severe family conflict and violence, heavy alcohol use and poverty and disadvantage are all cited as key risk factors for girls’ involvement in offending and other types of behaviour which can lead to social exclusion. Minor assault and the influence of alcohol emerge as key features in girls offending patterns. Assaults commonly arise from disputes with friends or family members, or occur whilst girls are in a mixed peer group where assaults are perpetrated against another young person or a Police Officer. The impact of more formal responses by Police and YOTS are evident and show that the highly regulated and male oriented Youth Justice System hampers the likelihood of successful interventions with girls. This study cites the importance of gender specific responses and interventions which are holistic, informal and flexible to meet the distinct needs and offending patterns of girls in the Youth Justice System. More widely early identification of girls at risk, information sharing across children, health and adult services, and the provision of a range of support and positive opportunities to girls which extend beyond the life of a Court Order are identified as key aspects of strategies aimed at improving future outcomes for girls.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Issue Date:
Oct-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/135244
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire for the Professional Doctorate in Youth Justice
Appears in Collections:
PhD e-theses; The Centre for Young People, Poverty and Social Disadvantage

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Jeanette Deborahen
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-04T11:54:48Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-04T11:54:48Z-
dc.date.issued2009-10-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/135244-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire for the Professional Doctorate in Youth Justiceen
dc.description.abstractAmidst growing concerns about a rise in girls entering the Youth Justice System and official data highlighting increases in girls violent offending this doctoral thesis focuses on girls in the Youth Justice System. Drawing on case files and in depth interviews with a cohort of girls supervised by a Home Counties Youth Offending Team (YOT), and interviews with YOT practitioners it explores their needs and offending patterns and examines contemporary system responses to them. It aims to contribute to practice knowledge and understanding about girls offending, and to identify approaches and interventions most likely to be effective with them. Findings point to girls having multiple and interrelated needs and troubled backgrounds. Exclusion from school and non attendance, experience of severe family conflict and violence, heavy alcohol use and poverty and disadvantage are all cited as key risk factors for girls’ involvement in offending and other types of behaviour which can lead to social exclusion. Minor assault and the influence of alcohol emerge as key features in girls offending patterns. Assaults commonly arise from disputes with friends or family members, or occur whilst girls are in a mixed peer group where assaults are perpetrated against another young person or a Police Officer. The impact of more formal responses by Police and YOTS are evident and show that the highly regulated and male oriented Youth Justice System hampers the likelihood of successful interventions with girls. This study cites the importance of gender specific responses and interventions which are holistic, informal and flexible to meet the distinct needs and offending patterns of girls in the Youth Justice System. More widely early identification of girls at risk, information sharing across children, health and adult services, and the provision of a range of support and positive opportunities to girls which extend beyond the life of a Court Order are identified as key aspects of strategies aimed at improving future outcomes for girls.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.subjectyouth justiceen
dc.subjectyoung offendersen
dc.subjectfemale young offendersen
dc.subjectsocial exclusionen
dc.subjectL560 Probation/After Careen
dc.titleReal bad girls : the origins and nature of offending by girls and young women involved with a county youth offending team and systemic responses to themen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bedfordshireen
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