Managing in the middle, the practice of managing change in English Universities

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/134952
Title:
Managing in the middle, the practice of managing change in English Universities
Authors:
Sarchet, Christopher
Abstract:
Higher Education Institutions are worth £45 billion to the UK economy, according to a report published in 2006 by Universities UK (UUK), the representative organization of the United Kingdom’s universities. The higher education sector has undergone considerable change with the introduction of the marketplace, tuition fees and business management structures and methods. Managing change as a middle manager is acknowledged to be important activity (see for example, Beer, Eisenstat and Spector, 1990) and yet there is a limited amount of empirically research that has been conducted to discover how change is managed in the higher education sector in England by these staff. This study explores the perceptions of higher education managers about their role in managing change in the higher education sector. It is an exploratory study based on thirty-one interviews with managers in nine universities from across the higher education sector in England. The universities were chosen to ensure there was a representative sample from the main groups within the sector and a geographical spread across the country’s regions. The literature review found a wide range of contrasting viewpoints that provided a myriad of support and confusing messages. There was a lack of information about how higher education managers manage and, in particular, how they manage change. Managers, and those who seek to help them, face challenges in seeking and providing guidance and improving practice. The middle manager has to manage change and use a variety of means to achieve it. They are caught in the middle between senior managers and staff and other stakeholders. They have primarily learned from experience but need support and guidance when they come across change projects of which they have no knowledge. This can be provided by access to case based practice and a network of experienced experts. This research recommends the creation of such support using new media available via the internet provided through professional associations such as the Association of University Administrators (AUA).
Issue Date:
30-Apr-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/134952
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Business Administration of the University of Bedfordshire
Appears in Collections:
PhD e-theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSarchet, Christopheren
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-30T10:43:29Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-30T10:43:29Z-
dc.date.issued2009-04-30-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/134952-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted for the degree of Doctor of Business Administration of the University of Bedfordshireen
dc.description.abstractHigher Education Institutions are worth £45 billion to the UK economy, according to a report published in 2006 by Universities UK (UUK), the representative organization of the United Kingdom’s universities. The higher education sector has undergone considerable change with the introduction of the marketplace, tuition fees and business management structures and methods. Managing change as a middle manager is acknowledged to be important activity (see for example, Beer, Eisenstat and Spector, 1990) and yet there is a limited amount of empirically research that has been conducted to discover how change is managed in the higher education sector in England by these staff. This study explores the perceptions of higher education managers about their role in managing change in the higher education sector. It is an exploratory study based on thirty-one interviews with managers in nine universities from across the higher education sector in England. The universities were chosen to ensure there was a representative sample from the main groups within the sector and a geographical spread across the country’s regions. The literature review found a wide range of contrasting viewpoints that provided a myriad of support and confusing messages. There was a lack of information about how higher education managers manage and, in particular, how they manage change. Managers, and those who seek to help them, face challenges in seeking and providing guidance and improving practice. The middle manager has to manage change and use a variety of means to achieve it. They are caught in the middle between senior managers and staff and other stakeholders. They have primarily learned from experience but need support and guidance when they come across change projects of which they have no knowledge. This can be provided by access to case based practice and a network of experienced experts. This research recommends the creation of such support using new media available via the internet provided through professional associations such as the Association of University Administrators (AUA).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjecthigher education managementen
dc.subjectchange managementen
dc.subjectuniversity managementen
dc.subjectmiddle managementen
dc.subjecthigher education administrationen
dc.subjectN214 Change Managementen
dc.titleManaging in the middle, the practice of managing change in English Universitiesen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen
dc.type.qualificationlevelDoctoralen
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bedfordshireen
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